Bignon Grande Champagne 1800 through an auction

If you have a bottle, too – and don’t know where it came from, what its history is like or need to know its market price: Contact us! Just send us the information you have and some pictures and we’ll post it here while trying to get some more information about it in the region.

If you know about this bottle, please leave a comment below the article! Thanks a lot.
Click on the pictures to see them at a bigger size.


I don’t know anything about fine Cognac, so I was hoping for a little help and input from you. I recently purchased two full, corked bottles of cognac at an auction. They were mixed up in a group of old dirty bottles.

One is a Bignon Grande Champagne 1800 with label. The second bottle has no label, but does have an embossed seal of an “N” and a crown. The US tax seal says “three star, cognac brandy, fine champagne 1885”.

Bignon Grande Champagne 1800

I am assuming this to be a Napoleon Cognac. Both bottles are corked and full, the the wax seal is gone. Both bottles have a very deep punt with pontil marks.

Bignon Grande Champagne 1800

Both bottles have partial US tax stamps and seals. I was wondering if I have stumbled onto a great find or if I purchased two very old looking fakes.

Bignon Grande Champagne 1800

Comments (13)

  1. John April 6, 2010 at 11:32 am

    I’m commenting on my own bottles, I made a typo. The 1885 is supposed to be 1835.

  2. Pleasetell May 11, 2010 at 4:07 pm

    To me, they look like bottles from the early, mid 1800’s, which can lead us to believe that they are young bottlings, in old bottles. That they haven’t had much storage in barrels, before they where put on bottle, that is.

    This would be an interesting find, for comparisons; to find an equally young grand champagne produced today, and to find the difference produced by method, grapes used and about 200 years on bottle.

    From the pictures, and your description, they do not strike me as fakes, but rather young eaux de vies, from a different time.

  3. John May 13, 2010 at 3:17 am

    Thank you for the comments, I’m holding on to these for awhile until I can find someone to confirm they are the vintage cognac. I understand that if they are real and of the period dated, they could have quite a value.

  4. James June 23, 2010 at 10:26 pm

    I’ll buy them from you E-mail at xxxxx@xxx.xxx (Comment by Admin: Dear James, please make your offer here in this post, rather than posting your email address. Thank you for your understanding)

  5. Stefan July 16, 2010 at 9:53 pm

    The Bignon is genuine, the 2nd bottle probably as well. Bignon’s pop up every now and then (some years ago a larger number of Bignon 1800 where located in France and they are offered on European auctions). The second bottle, 1835, does look like the bottles from Palais de Compiegne (1802 & 1811). Is the date branded into the cork ?

  6. John July 30, 2010 at 1:15 am

    I don’t see a branded date, part of the cork has been chewed by a rodent. The 1835 is on the federal stamp.

  7. Stefan August 7, 2010 at 10:06 pm

    Hi John, with regards to the value of the bottles: the Bignon does go for prices between 1500-2500. The other bottle, lacking a label (and thus info about the producer) would be worth no more then 200-300 Euro. I did however once stumble into a 1835 Hector Romain 3 star brandy which might very well be the producer of your bottle. There are not many brands which ever put a 1835 vintage on the market. One thing is puzzling me: 3-star quality is seldom used for a vintage cognac, perhaps the date just indicates when the bottle entered the US rather then to actually represent the vintage year. I will get back to you on this matter.

  8. John August 10, 2010 at 12:51 am

    Stefan, you were right on all counts, I sold the bottles to a gentleman and he has opened the one without the label. He was pleased to report that it was real and vintage. When he pushed the cork into the bottle and it got wet the brand showed up and it was a Hector Romain in a Napoleon bottle. Since that bottle was real I’m assuming you were correct about the Bignon being real. Thanks for all your imput.

  9. Stefan August 12, 2010 at 8:16 pm

    Dear John, glad my advise was worth something. Regards, Stefan.

  10. James August 30, 2010 at 3:57 am

    I’m the gentleman who bought the bottles most of the hector romain is gone but i must say one of the finest i have ever had. Great nose, hints of spice,honey,frut so very smooth,long on the palate. It was more like drinking a extra than a three star.

  11. sam October 15, 2010 at 4:15 pm

    You are lucky, James. :)

  12. James February 11, 2011 at 3:28 am

    Hi agian every one,
    Just wanted to let you know i have drank all of the 1800 Bignon.
    This was not just a cognac but better than sex and i would have never thought i would say that. This was trurly the most fragrent most floral you would have thought you where in a field of flowers. I will chase that flavor the rest of my life.
    If one could say that they love pre-phylloxera cognac i would say i do.
    I will never be abel to drink the cognac of today with out longing for tast of yesterday. If you ever have the chance to drink pre-phylloxera you should do so
    it is a tast you will never forget. The cognac lover James peace and love to all

  13. Richard August 1, 2015 at 11:20 pm

    I haveI have a bottleof Hannesti that looks very much like the one in the picture this one says that it is 1.8 and three-quarter fluid ounces net and the alcohol is 49 1/2% it’s a three star and it’s still cork all of the top of the court is broke off but it is sealed I have no idea of the age other than I know it’s very old and was in the wall of us saloon and I have itis there anything you can tell me about that

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